the future isn’t what it used to be
Lotte Andersen
Jack Jubb
30 October 2021 — 9 January 2022

…transgressions of the line between natural and non-; elements out-of-place; crossed borders and cultures, inappropriate intimacies.

Horror in Architecture, Joshua Comaroff & Ong Ker-Shing

 

For Moarain House’s inaugural show, the future isn’t what it used to be, Lotte Andersen and Jack Jubb bring together the sonic and the visual to probe the tension between fantasy and reality; sounding out ways of understanding the architecture of a space, of a body, of a politics, of a collective mindset.

 

The work of both artists finds its genesis in methodologies of archiving, gathering recordings and images from a variety of sources. For Andersen, her approach is that of the ‘crate digger,’ the archetypal record store bargain hunter, while key for Jubb is the search engine: the nexus that both flattens and levels the plane of all media. This is not a process of nostalgia but a point of enquiry into ideas surrounding memory and the spectres of both personal and collective histories.

 

Lotte Andersen’s newly conceived sound work, which lends its title to the exhibition, highlights the circularity and absurdity of history. Made in collaboration with the artist’s father, the future isn’t what it used to be weaves together audio clips from the 1970s and the last two years, drawing parallels between the socio-political environments of their respective youths in the UK. Throughout the work, the question remains “is this true, is this real?” A speech from Donald Trump’s 2020 election campaign is overlaid with Willy Wonka’s Pure Imagination, but, the artist asks us, which is ‘real’ and which is not? The absurdity of recent politics can surely be read as an elaborate joke.

 

In a series of new paintings Jack Jubb merges images of interiors from Architectural Digest with creatures taken from science fiction to explore his interest in speculative universes as a kind of metaphysical lens; a device for looking at our own world. These images of idealised domesticity, so rooted in our contemporary consumer condition as signifiers of ‘good’ taste, are brought into a relationship with fantasy art which can often be seen as the antithesis. As such these paintings become insurgent, forcing the crass and the camp to engage with the austere and minimalist—a violation of good taste.

 

Jubb uses the aesthetic of the airbrush to investigate notions of the poor image. In her essay, “In Defense of the Poor Image” (2009), Hito Steyerl interrogated this ghost of an image, “itinerant …distributed for free, squeezed through slow digital connections, compressed, reproduced, ripped and remixed.” In an age of ever increasing fidelity, low resolution images demonstrate an ability to be haunting, they can be seen to ‘weird’ the quotidian or the banal. Can this practice of weirding be used to skew perceptions within the real and allow us perspectives onto the contemporary condition?

 

the future isn’t what it used to be seeks to exist in a fantasy realm whilst also remaining rooted in lived experience. Both bodies of work engage with subject matter that could be classified in either category; neither subscribe to the binary of truth or not truth. Without defined boundaries the works bleed out into their environment, and the space seeps into them: a process of reciprocal osmosis. A multi-focal, multiply-inhabited way of being. How much do we become our environment as our environment becomes us? In a time of heightened escapism, are we falling into obliteration? Or is this another loop within the inevitable circularity of life? Welcome to the ‘roaring twenties’ 2.0.

Lotte Andersen (b.1989, London) is a British artist working with constructed social interactions, scanned ephemera, sound, video and sculpture to produce installations. Her work forms an investigation into group dynamics, movement within varied contexts, the manipulation of nostalgia, trauma, euphoria and release. Oscillating between investigative, documentary, participatory, and autobiographical; the viewer is often placed within the work, activating it whilst dealing with the implications of their presence. She considers sound and video physical objects in space, working with the idea that echoic (sound) memory is stored for longer periods of time than iconic (visual) memory. Presented individually the works function like relics, revealing a residue or core in the process of deconstruction, creating a window toward the wider narrative of her practice. Joy is an act of resistance. Recent exhibitions include: It’s not you, it's me. It's complicated, Ginsberg Gallery Lima, Peru (2020), Propositions for Alternative Narratives, Photoworks, UK (2020), The Economics of Movement with Alonso Leon-Velarde, The Whitechapel Gallery London, UK (2019), Dance Therapy, Good Night; Energy Flash at Hyundai Card Storage foundation, Seoul, KR (2019). Andersen lives and works in Mexico City.

Jack Jubb (b. 1993, Oxford) creates ghostly airbrushed paintings deriving from a bricolage of digital images spanning e-commerce, social media, and cinema amongst other sources. Through these processes of mechanically mediated painting and digital research, Jubb examines notions of the Poor Image and how hierarchies within the resolution, or fidelity of images relate to essential questions of truth and untruth surrounding memory; whether experienced via gauzy nostalgia, fantasy, or the haunted sites of trauma. Jubb received his BA from Goldsmiths, University of London, London (2015). Recent exhibitions include: solo show, DJ Berlin, Berlin (forthcoming), Earthlings, The Residence Gallery, London (2021), Halcyon on and on, Franz Kaka, Toronto (2021), Being Here, Kupfer Project, London (2021), Gnosis Show, Daisy’s Room, London (2021) and Des Nous Jours, Osnova Gallery, London (2021). Jubb lives and works in London.
 

MH 1_WEB.jpg

 

the future isn’t what it used to be, installation view
Moarain House,
30 October 2021 — 9 January 2022

MH 8_WEB.jpg

 

the future isn’t what it used to be, installation view
Moarain House,
30 October 2021 — 9 January 2022

Jack Jubb, Stainless (table)_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Stainless (table), 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
30 x 30 cm

Jack Jubb, Stainless (Barcelona)_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Stainless (barcelona), 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
30 x 30 cm

MH 5_WEB.jpg

 

the future isn’t what it used to be, installation view

Moarain House, 30 October 2021 — 9 January 2022

Jack Jubb, Home is where the haunt is (series)1_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Home is where the haunt is (series), 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
76 x 56 cm

Jack Jubb, Home is where the haunt is (series)2_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Home is where the haunt is (series), 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
76 x 56 cm

Jack Jubb, Home is where the haunt is (series)3_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Home is where the haunt is (series), 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
76 x 56 cm

Jack Jubb, Kirsten_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Kirsten, 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
104 x 70 cm

Jack Jubb, Chalice_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Chalice, 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
76 x 56 cm

Lotte Andersen, the future isn't what it used to be_WEB.jpg

 

Lotte Andersen
The future isn’t what it used to be, 2021
Speakers, cables, hat, pins, vase, amp, media player, audio (11 minutes)
Dimensions variable

Lotte Andersen, the future isn't what it used to be (detail)1_WEB.jpg

 

Lotte Andersen
The future isn’t what it used to be, 2021
detail

Lotte Andersen, the future isn't what it used to be (detail)2_WEB.jpg

 

Lotte Andersen
The future isn’t what it used to be, 2021
detail

MH 6_WEB.jpg

 

the future isn’t what it used to be, installation view

Moarain House, 30 October 2021 — 9 January 2022

Jack Jubb, Xenos_WEB.jpg

 

Jack Jubb
Xenos, 2021
Acrylic on cotton rag paper
70 x 104 cm.

Lotte Andersen, the future isn't what it used to be (detail)3_WEB.jpg

 

Lotte Andersen
The future isn’t what it used to be, 2021
Single channel audio
11 minutes


Edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof

MH 4_WEB.jpg

 

the future isn’t what it used to be, installation view

Moarain House, 30 October 2021 — 9 January 2022